The Beatles and Sgt. Pepper: A Fans’ Perspective

The Beatles and Sgt. Pepper: A Fans’ Perspective is just that — a book about Sgt. Pepper, written by fans for fans.

Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band is the most famous album by the most famous band in the history of rock ’n’ roll. It became the soundtrack for the Summer of Love (1967), with its music constantly flowing out of Hi-Fi systems, portable record players and radios throughout the world. That summer, people weren’t just listening and dancing to Sgt. Pepper, they were discussing its music, its sounds, its lyrics and its remarkable cover. The attention to detail taken by The Beatles for every aspect of the album, from its recording down to the red and white psychedelic inner sleeve that held the vinyl disc, made Sgt. Pepper an all-encompassing and mind-blowing experience collectively shared by millions.

In addition to essays written by Spizer, Al Sussman, Frank Daniels, Piers Hemmingsen and Bill King, the book contains over 80 fan recollections ranging from “everyday people” to Beatles authors (Mark Lewisohn) and musicians (Peter Tork of The Monkees, Pat Dinizio of The Smithereens, former Wings drummer Denny Seiwell and Billy Joel). The book has over a hundred full color and original black and white images, including intimate photographs from 1967 of fans holding the album cover. These images and heart-felt memories add a personal touch demonstrating the true impact of the act we’ve known for all these years, Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

As with Bruce’s other books, and in keeping with the spirit of the Sgt. Pepper album, The Beatles and Sgt. Pepper: A Fans’ Perspective is a treat both visually and from an information and story-telling experience.

Digital $20
Hardcover $30
Collector’s Edition $75

 

Clear

Description

1st edition, 2017

176 pages
9″ x 9″
Hardbound

full color throughout
ISBN# 978-0-9832957-4-7

 

Table of Contents

“And the jukebox kept on playin’ Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band…”
An American Beatles fan perspective by Bruce Spizer

Remember Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club is The Beatles

Canada’s Centennial Celebration Gets A Present From The Beatles by Piers Hemmingsen

The Communal Sgt. Pepper by Al Sussman

The World of Sgt. Pepper: Pop Music Came to a Crossroads in 1967by Al Sussman

Call his wife in: Influences on and of Sgt. Pepper by Frank Daniels

Fan Recollections

A Fan’s Notes: 1967­— It Really Was the Summer of … Change by Bill King

Sgt. Pepper Invades the World

Who Am I To Stop A Good Rumor? The Sgt. Pepper Packaging

Recording History: Who Did What?

Fab Four Fan Favs

Collector's edition extras

poster-bookmark

Reviews

Bruce’s passion does the world a service. He creates a way station for people like me who believe that what The Beatles created (in all of its musical incarnations, manifestations and associated product analysis) is an emotional connection to something more than just pop music. Bruce helps us to see into frameworks of creative, cultural and stylistic importance that wouldn’t be mined were it not for his passion.  It is all so endlessly fascinating to me and this book is so necessary because the damn album is that important!—John French

I’ve just scrolled through the pdf of the book, and then again backwards. It looks beautiful, interesting and useful, which does not, of course, surprise me at all. Looking forward to really digging into it.–Allan Kozinn

I had a vision of what the book would be like…and that vision was pretty impressive. But you (and all of your contributors from Tom Frangione…love that photo!) to Billy Joel to Mark Lewisohn (another priceless photo!) to Mark Lapidos and the story about his brother…you all exceeded any expectation I had. This book is priceless. It is absolutely beautiful. You should be So. Very. Proud. Wow.–Jude Southerland Kessler

40 comments

  1. Farrell McNulty

    In 1973, at the age of 10, I bought an Apple reissue of the album for $4.57 in the Sears record department. Our original mono pressing was worn out and scratched up for years and when I had some cash, I thought this was the perfect time to get a new one. That was the first time I’d heard the album straight through. I loved all the fairground sound effects on Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite and all the noise on Lovely Rita as well as that on Good Morning Good Morning. It was also my first time hearing the stereo mix and it was a lot of fun turning the balance switch from side to side so I could hear the separate channels with all the different sounds on each speaker.

    Forty-four years later, the album still blows me away as it’s just as beautiful to listen to as it is to look at. I have the stereo and mono CDs now as well as the mono vinyl reissue. It still sounds fresh and exciting. The applause and laughter sound effects notwithstanding, it feels like much more than just a great album, it really feels like I’m attending a performance and then walk out of the “theater” in a daze after that brilliant piano chord at the end. It certainly makes good on its guarantees of a smile and a splendid time.

  2. Timothy Swan

    I became a full-fledged Beatles fan in 1972 at age eleven when my brother bought a copy of this classic album that summer, 5 years after its release. I do recall that it was a stereo copy. It was on the lime green Capitol label. Once that wore out, he replaced it with a copy on the Apple label; same great album. By the time I reached my senior year in high school in 1980, I finally got my own copy of this album on the purple label. I do remember that the lime green label version had both the cardboard cut-out insert and the red/pink/white inner sleeve, whereas the two other copies that followed had only the cardboard insert. For English class, I wrote an essay about the album and got an A! Fifteen years later near the end of June, I went to a used record store in Portland, Oregon. There was a near-mint copy of the album in mono with everything intact. It was being sold for $200.00. Realizing that this was more than I was planning to spend, I went over to a yard sale a little less than a mile away. The man in charge of the yard sale had five mono copies of the album, all in varying conditions. All five copies had both the custom inner sleeve and the cardboard insert. All five discs were from very good plus to mint minus condition. I asked him, “How much would you take for one of these albums?” He said, “a buck each.” Without hesitation, I quickly purchased all five of them! I still have them to this day. One of them has the complete title of “With A Little Help From My Friends” on the side one label. Of course, I enjoy listening to both the mono and stero versions of this album. It Was 50 Years Ago Today!

  3. Dan Lawton

    We all know Strawberry Fields/Penny Lane were meant for Sgt Pepper, but they made another album to include those two once they became such favorites.
    A true remake of Sgt Pepper, as a childhood reminiscence as planned, would possibly require a mish-mash of both Pepper and MMT. Here are my submissions for such a 16 song (double?) album:
    1. Sgt Pepper 1
    2. Help from my Friends.
    3. S. Fields.
    4. She’s Leaving Home.
    5. Lucy.
    6. Your Mother Should Know.
    7. Within/Without You (End of Side 1),
    8. Magical Mystery Tour.
    9. Penny Lane.
    10. I Am The Walrus. (Lewis Carrol)
    11. When I’m 64. (A childhood tale if ever heard)
    12. Fool on the Hill.
    13. Mr. Kite.
    14. Hello Goodbye.
    15. Sgt Pepper Reprise.
    16. A Day In The Life.

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